Destinations

Africa
America
Asia
Europe
Oceania

Main events

Italy
Europe

Warning!!!

Africa
America
Asia
Europe
Oceania

Google
Anchorage
Anchorage started as a tent camp for for workers building the Alaska Railroad in 1915. The city stands between the Chugach Mountains and the waters of upper Cook Inlet. Between the 1930s and the 1950s, the city experienced massive growth as air transportation and the military became increasingly important. Even with that, though, Anchorage did not start becoming a city in earnest until the late 1950s, when oil was discovered on the Kenai Peninsula, to the south.

What to see

Many visitors never make it beyond the downtown area, the old-fashioned grid of streets at the northwest corner of town where the large hotels and gift shops are located.

Old city hall
old city hall anchorage tourism anchorage tourist board visit anchorage hotels alaska tourism bureau anchorage

This building is on the right of 4th Avenue as you approach E Street. Housing the office of the Anchorage Convention and Visitors Bureau, the building, originally built in 1936, is a two-story structure that served as the city's first government seat. The lobby contains a fun and illuminating free display on city history, including dioramas of the early streetscape, old photographs, and the fire bell and fire pole that once were used in this building. Admission is free.

Resolution Park
old city hall anchorage tourism anchorage tourist board visit anchorage hotels alaska tourism bureau anchorage

This large wooden platform offers terrific views of Cook Inlet (named for the man who discovered this waterway in 1778).
The bronze Captain Cook Monument stands on a large wooden deck, and biographical and historical information are part of the monument.
The park’s informative signs, powerful mounted binoculars, and commanding vantage point make this a rewarding stop for gazing out at the water and the mountains beyond: visitors can look at Fire Island, Mt. Susitna or the Alaska Range across the Inlet. This is also a great way to get a closer view of the largest mountain in North America, Mt. McKinley (20,320 feet), 120 miles away.
The waters you see are ferocious and wild, with whirlpool currents and a tidal range of almost 40 vertical feet.
The shore across the inlet, about 2 miles away, is virtually uninhabited.

 
Wendler Building
old city hall anchorage tourism anchorage tourist board visit anchorage hotels alaska tourism bureau anchorage

Originally built in 1915, this award-winning building is among the oldest buildings in Anchorage and has the only corner turret found in Anchorage. The bronze statue of the dog commemorates the sled-dog races that start here. Across D Street is a mural that depicts a map of coastal Alaska and B.C., with the Iditarod Trail dimly marked.

Town Square
old city hall anchorage tourism anchorage tourist board visit anchorage hotels alaska tourism bureau anchorage

This is the town's center for many events and celebrations. During the summer, this flower-filled park hosts concerts and festivals; while in the winter, this is the location for some of the New Year's Eve fireworks and the town's Christmas tree lighting ceremony centers around the park's huge fir trees. The community raised money for improvements to the town square by collecting donations of $40 each for the granite bricks, with an inscription of the contributor’s choosing. There are 13,344 bricks. On the east side of the square, the "Whaling Wall", created by the artist Wyland in 1994. It's a spectacular mural, showing bowhead whales, belugas, seals - the marine life of Alaska.
He painted similar whale murals in cities all along the West Coast. The building on the northeast corner of the square is one of the city’s oldest and was saved from demolition when the park was created; it contains a charming gift and candy shop.

 

Museums

Anchorage Museum of History and Art

The state’s largest museum doesn’t have its largest collection, but unlike the Alaska State Museum in Juneau or the University of Alaska Museum in Fairbanks, the Anchorage museum has the room and staff to teach and to serve as a center of contemporary culture unmatched at this northern latitude, at least on this side of the globe. Its permanent collection numbers more than 17,500 objects, 2,000 artifacts and 350,000 historical photographs. This collection offers an overview of the Alaska's rich history and an introduction to its varied culture. Life-size dioramas show Alaskan homes and work environments from the 1920s; traditional village dwellings of Alaska's Aleuts, Eskimos and Indians; homes of early Russian settlers and Gold Rush-era pioneers; and an actual piece of the Alaska Pipeline.
Most visitors tour the large Alaska Gallery, an informative and enjoyable walk through the history and some of the anthropology of the state. In the art galleries, you can see what’s happening in art in Alaska today; Alaskan art isn’t all scenery and walrus ivory, but the grandeur of the state does influence almost every work. It’s the only museum in Alaska that can require more than one visit.
The Museum shop, voted one of the best places to buy Alaska Native art and crafts by the Anchorage Daily News, is a must-see.
121 W. 7th Ave.
Tel. 907/343-4326

visit Anchorage tourism Anchorage tourist board discover Anchorage tousim bureau Alaska attractions Anchorage Museum