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Travel warnings

If the country you intend to visit has a Travel Warning, you may wish to reconsider your travel plans. Before cancelling, check with your travel agent, your travel insurer or the airline/tour operator, as cancelling a scheduled trip may cost you money.
The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the individual.
The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety. The purpose of this Travel Report is to provide travellers with up-to-date information to enable them to make well-informed decisions.

Afghanistan: Avoid all travel (30 apr 2008)

The security situation remains extremely volatile and unpredictable. The threat to foreign nationals, including Canadians, from terrorist and criminal violence in Afghanistan is high and insurgency attacks are not expected to diminish. There have been a number of attacks against the United Nations and other non-governmental organizations (NGOs), ISAF, coalition forces, and foreign nationals. There is also an increasingly significant risk of foreign nationals being kidnapped throughout Afghanistan; appropriate precautions should be taken with regards to personal safety. There have been numerous kidnappings against Westerners, including journalists and those working with NGOs. Some victims have been killed.
If you are in Afghanistan, you should consider leaving. Travellers who decide to remain in Afghanistan should ensure that they have personal security measures in place. You are reminded to always exercise extreme caution, particularly in public areas frequented by foreigners (hotels, restaurants, shops and market place), to avoid all crowds and demonstrations, and to monitor local developments closely.
Remnants of the former Taliban regime, the terrorist al-Qaeda network, as well as criminal groups remain active in various areas. The justice sector is underdeveloped. Afghan security forces depend heavily on assistance from international security forces.
Millions of landmines throughout the countryside pose a threat. No area can be considered safe.

Albania: Exercise high degree of caution (04 mar 2008)

The crime level in Albania is high. Economic hardship and easy availability of firearms increase the risk of violent incidents. Street crime, such as pickpocketing and mugging, occur, especially after dark. Pickpocketing is more frequent on buses than on city streets. Do not show signs of affluence. Ensure personal belongings, passports and other travel documents are secure and carry a photocopy of your passport’s identification page at all times. Avoid travelling after dark in remote areas. Carjackings and armed attacks have been reported. Criminal gangs operate along roads in remote areas. Northern districts of Has, Kukës and Tropojë are still considered dangerous. In Tirana, dial 129 for police.
Women should exercise caution when travelling alone. Avoid secluded areas, parks, local bars, and restaurants in remote areas, especially after dark.
Demonstrations should be avoided, as they may escalate and turn violent with little or no warning.
North east region bordering Kosovo: We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to the north east region bordering Kosovo (including the cities of Bajram Curri and Tropoje) due to the risk of criminal violence and unexploded ordnance along the Albania-Kosovo border. Armed criminal gangs are particularly prevalent in this north-east region, and foreigners have been robbed and assaulted when travelling in the area.

Algeria: Reconsider your need to travel (16 may 2008)

We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Algeria at this time because of the very high threat of terrorist attack. We receive regular reports indicating that terrorists are planning attacks against a range of targets, including places frequented by foreigners and Western interests, as well as premises and symbols associated with the Algerian Government.
Terrorists have in the past mounted attacks on significant dates and anniversaries but attacks could occur anywhere and at any time. If you do decide to travel to Algeria, you should exercise extreme caution. There is an ongoing and renewed risk of terrorist attack in Algeria.
Outside Algiers, the situation in the non-urban mountainous region east of Algiers (Kabylia) and in the coastal mountains running from Blida to Ain Defla is dangerous. Terrorist attacks occur at night in rural and remote areas, on public transportation outside the major cities, and in some parts of the country.
Internal travel should be done by air. If road travel outside of Algiers is necessary, it should be done during daylight hours.
Two Austrians disappeared at the end of February 2008 while on an excursion in the desert. The kidnapping may have occurred in the southern border zone between Tunisia and Algeria, but the exact location remains to be determined.
Illizi, Tamanrasset and Adrar: We advise against all travel in the remote desert areas in the wilayas (provinces) of Illizi, Tamanrasset and Adrar.

Angola: Avoid non-essential travel (18 Jan 2008)

We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Angola, with the exception of the capital Luanda.
You are advised against to exercise a high degree of caution when traveling to the cities of Luanda, Huambo, Benguela, Lubango, Malange, Sumbe, Kuito, Soyo, Namibe and all other provincial capitals because of the risk of civil unrest and criminal violence.
If you decide to travel to other parts of Angola, you should exercise extreme caution.
Landmines are a risk throughout Angola outside major cities. Travel outside these cities should be conducted under the auspices of international organizations with considerable knowledge of the country.

Argentina: Exercise caution (07 May 2008)

We advise you to exercise caution and monitor developments that might affect your safety in Argentina because of the risk of criminal activity.
Violent crimes such as armed robbery continue to be a problem in major tourist areas, particularly in Buenos Aires. Kidnappings occur in Buenos Aires. To date, kidnappings have tended to be targeted at locals rather than tourists.
Incidents of 'express kidnappings', where individuals are forced to withdraw funds from ATMs to secure their release, have occurred.
Crimes against car passengers, particularly when stopping at traffic lights, are a problem. You should keep windows closed and doors locked whilst travelling in major cities.
Petty crime including pickpocketing, bag snatching and bag slitting is common, particularly on public transport. Distraction thefts occur in public areas such as internet cafes, the subway system, train and bus stations: travellers have substances put on their clothing to distract them while they are being robbed. Criminals can use force if they encounter resistance from tourists.
Criminals are known to pose as taxi operators at the airport and may operate in collusion with other taxi drivers. Radio taxis and 'remises' (chauffeured cars) can be booked by telephone or at the airport arrivals hall. Official taxis are clearly marked as 'radio taxi' with the taxi firm's name and telephone number visible. Travellers have been robbed when using taxis hailed on the street.
Driving in Argentina can be dangerous because aggressive driving practices and excessive speed are widespread.

Armenia: Exercise high degree of caution (04 Mar 2008)

The land border with Turkey is closed, although there are regular flights between Yerevan and Istanbul. Exercise a high degree of caution in the land border areas.
You should avoid all protests and demonstrations as they may turn violent.
Driving in Armenia may be dangerous due to local driving practices, poorly maintained roads and vehicles, and inadequate road signs.
Public transport is overcrowded and poorly maintained. Minibuses are particularly dangerous and are frequently involved in accidents.
Nagorno-Karabakh: We advise against non-essential travel to Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding areas due to tensions resulting from the political situation and military presence. The border with Azerbaijan is closed. A cease-fire has been in effect since May 1994. However, armed clashes along the border and cease-fire line may occur sporadically. There are numerous landmines surrounding the conflict zones with Nagorno-Karabakh.

Azerbaijan: Exercise high degree of caution (25 Mar 2008)

Street crime, such as pick-pocketing, and attacks on foreigners, occur. You should avoid demonstrations and large gatherings of a political nature.
Ensure personal belongings, passports, and other travel documents are secure. Do not show signs of affluence. Avoid walking alone after dark. Use only officially marked taxis and do not share them with strangers.
Nagorno-Karabakh: We advise against non-essential travel to Nagorno-Karabakh and the surrounding areas due to tensions resulting from the political situation and military presence. The border with Armenia is closed because of the unresolved Nagorno-Karabakh dispute. A cease-fire has been in effect since May 1994, however armed clashes along the border and cease-fire line continue. Travel to certain areas of the country is restricted. Visitors should not attempt to enter or leave Azerbaijan via land borders with Russia (i.e., Dagestan) or Armenia. The conflict zones are heavily mined, and civilians are regularly maimed or killed by unmarked mines. It is not possible to enter the self-proclaimed "Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh" from Azerbaijan.

Bangladesh: Exercise high degree of caution (13 Feb 2008)

We advise you to exercise a high degree of caution in Bangladesh at this time due to the unpredictable security and political situation.
A state of emergency declared by the President on 11 January 2007 remains in force in Bangladesh. There has been an increased police and military presence on the streets.
Violence has traditionally been a characteristic of Bangladeshi politics. Political activity has been curtailed under the provisions of the state of emergency, however demonstrations can flare up almost anywhere with little notice and develop into violent confrontations.
Illegal demonstrations, street rallies and public gatherings, including localised industrial disputes, can develop with little or no warning in provincial centres and major cities. Such events can become catalysts for violence and civil disorder.
Terrorists conducted a series of attacks, including a suicide bombing, against domestic targets in Bangladesh in 2005. Further attacks are possible. The risk of terrorist attack against Western interests and kidnapping of Westerners remains high.
We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to the Chittagong Hill Tracts region because of the high risk of kidnapping and politically motivated violence.

Burma (Myanmar): Exercise high degree of caution (June 05, 2008)

The political situation in Burma is fragile. In September 2007 sizable protests and demonstrations resulted in violence and mass arrests. While the unrest has largely subsided, the possibility for future protests exists. Youshould avoid any large gatherings and public areas where demonstrations could take place.
Freedom of speech and political activity is not permitted, and the Burmese government suppresses any expression of opposition to its rule. Foreigners criticising the regime in public may be arrested or detained.
We advise you not to travel to border areas with Thailand due to ongoing insurgency, banditry, and risk of landmines. Border crossing points may close without notice.
We advise against non-essential travel to the Irrawaddy Delta due to extensive damage caused by Tropical Cyclone Nargis. Canadians currently in the region should leave if they feel it is safe to do so.

Burundi: Avoid non-essential travel (07 May 2008)

The general situation in Burundi has started to stabilize. Burundi successfully concluded its political transition process in 2005 following a constitutional referendum and a series of national elections, which were conducted peacefully. The government launched an Emergency Programme in February 2006. Nevertheless, sudden outbreaks of violence are still likely to take place throughout the country. Gunshots and explosions were reported in the vicinity of Bujumbura in April 2008. Attacks and ambushes by rebel forces occur frequently. Humanitarian workers, including foreigners, have been victims of violent incidents, including robbery and murder, by armed groups.
Periodic closure of the border between Burundi and the Democratic Republic of Congo can occur without notice.
We strongly advise you not to travel outside of the capital Bujumbura because of ongoing civil unrest and high levels of serious crime throughout Burundi. While the security situation has stabilised somewhat across the country, the risk of armed violence, banditry, kidnapping and cross-border attacks by rebels remains.
If you are in Burundi you should consider leaving unless you have compelling reasons to stay.
If you do decide to travel outside of the capital, we advise you to contact the UN office in Burundi for the latest security advice prior to travel.

Cameroon: Exercise high degree of caution (10 Apr 2008)

You are advised to exercise a high degree of caution in the country.
Travellers should maintain a high level of security awareness at all times and avoid public gatherings and street demonstrations.
Travellers should exercise a high degree of caution in the Kousseri area near the border with Chad, where there are large population movements.
Avoid non-essential travel to the border areas with the Central African Republic, to the Lake Chad area, to the Eastern provinces, and to the region of the Bakassi Peninsula along the Nigerian border, where implementation of the settlement concerning the territorial dispute between Cameroon and Nigeria continue to cause occasional tension and a certain instability. In these regions, car hijackings, assaults, kidnappings and other forms of armed banditry are recurrent. Overland travel in the Northern and Eastern provinces is dangerous due to their isolation and should be done in a convoy of at least two vehicles.

Central African Republic: Do not travel (03 Mar 2008)

We strongly advise you not to travel to the Central African Republic at this time due to the activities of rebel groups and rogue security and military forces, and high levels of serious crime and lawlessness.
We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to the capital Bangui at this time due to the tense and unstable security situation. If you do decide to travel to Bangui, you should exercise extreme caution.
Travel outside of Bangui is still dangerous. The possibility of another outbreak of fighting cannot be ruled out. Regional wars have increased access to weapons, and armed attacks occur, often consisting of highway robbery. Overland points of entry are closed to tourists since no security arrangements are provided for foreigners travelling outside the capital. Security is unstable throughout the country. Foreigners are often the targets of armed gangs.
Street crime is common in downtown Bangui. Armed gangs operate in outlying residential areas, and robberies from expatriate residences occur. You should not go to the KM5 market. Victims of crime may have to pay to transport police officers to the scene due to a shortage of police vehicles. Demonstrations occur and should be avoided. Exercise caution at all times, ensure your personal belongings are secure, and do not show signs of affluence. Tourist facilities are not widely available. It is recommended to carry only certified copies of your travel documents.

Chad: Avoid non-essential travel (16 Apr 2008)

The situation in this country remains unstable and could deteriorate rapidly.
Although there is a strong military presence in N’Djamena, the situation in the capital is rather calm following the fighting between rebels and government troops in February 2008. Travellers entering or exiting the capital must go through security check points.
If travel outside N'Djamena is unavoidable despite the Official Warning, a permit issued by the Ministry of Interior is required. The permit may take several days to be issued. Outside N’Djamena, telecommunication systems are very unreliable.
As incidents of road banditry and car-jacking involving violence are frequent, travellers are encouraged to travel in groups.
In northern Chad (especially in the Borkou-Ennedi-Tibesti region), the rebellion continues intermittently and the presence of landmines has been reported. Attempting to cross the Libyan border by land would be hazardous. In western Chad, contraband from Cameroon is frequently smuggled across the Chari River, which can result in armed intervention by Chadian customs and river police. Rural areas around Lake Chad are also subject to periodic violence.
Civil unrest and violent incidents can occur throughout the country at all times, including in N’Djamena. Carry all necessary travel documents, including valid passports and visas, at all times. Monitor local news, avoid large crowds and demonstrations where political violence may occur and follow the advice of local authorities.
We advise against all travel to the border areas with Sudan and the Central African Republic, where rebel groups are active and create an extremely insecure situation.
Attacks recently occurred in these areas. The Chad-Sudan border is currently closed. The humanitarian situation in eastern Chad (including the regions of Biltine and Ouaddaï) is serious, given the ongoing potential for transborder clashes and the presence of hundreds of thousands of Sudanese refugees who have fled the conflict in Darfur. Targeted attacks on humanitarian workers by bandits and armed militias have increased, and the government is promising an increase in national army patrols in this region. You should exercise extreme caution in and around the city of Abeche, where violent incidents have been reported. UNHCR recommends traveling in convoys of at least two vehicles and avoiding all movements in the region after 6:00 p.m.
There are live minefields in this region. Crossing the border anywhere in this area is extremely dangerous.

Colombia: Exercise high degree of caution (June 12, 2008)

In May 2008, an earthquake caused casualties and numerous injuries in Bogotá, in the Oriental Andean Cordillera and in central Colombia, including on the highway from Bogotá to Villavicencio. A number of aftershocks followed. Damages to buildings, water services, telecommunications systems and power plants have been reported. Transportation routes may be affected, in particular the highway from Bogotá to Villavicencio.
We advise you to exercise a high degree of caution in Colombia because of the high threat of terrorism and criminal activity. Terrorist, insurgent and paramilitary groups are active throughout Colombia and there is a high risk of kidnapping, including of foreigners.
Government buildings, public transport and commercial and entertainment centres are potential targets for terrorist attacks. Places frequented by foreigners could be targeted by groups.
Travellers should be vigilant and avoid any unattended packages or parcels and bring them to the attention of security personnel. Travel to most urban centres and major cities serviced by commercial air transportation, and the islands of San Andres and Providencia, can be undertaken if one exercises a high degree of caution.
For security reasons, it is preferable to arrive at Medellín's José Maria Córdova International Airport by day only to avoid the road from the airport to the city after dark.
In tourist resort areas of San Andrés Island, Providencia Island and Cartagena, criminal activity and violence directed at tourists is low, comparable to other destinations in the region. Travellers should however exercise common sense precautions.
In spite of recent improvements, petty and violent crime (including pickpocketing, assault, robbery, car bombing, hijacking, and murder) is prevalent in other regions of Colombia, both urban and rural. Visitors should exercise extreme caution. They should dress down, avoid wearing jewellery, and keep cameras and electronic equipment out of sight. It is advisable to carry minimal sums of money and to leave your passport and other travel documents locked in your hotel safe.
Avoid going to bars alone. Never leave your drink or food unattended. There have been numerous incidents of drugs being used (including scopolamine) to incapacitate travellers in order to rob them. Scopolamine can be administered through aerosols, cigarettes, gum, or in powder form. Typically, travellers are approached by someone asking directions; the drug is concealed in a piece of paper and is blown into the victim's face. Exercise extreme caution, as scopolamine can cause prolonged unconsciousness and serious medical problems.
Colombia has one of the highest kidnapping rates in the world. While kidnapping is primarily aimed at Colombians, foreigners can be targeted by guerrilla groups in all parts of the country, especially persons working for (or perceived to be working for) oil and mining companies.
"Express kidnappings" are frequent. Victims are usually picked up from the street and forced to withdraw funds from Automated Banking Machines (ABMs). Uncooperative victims have been injured. There have also been reports of individuals misrepresenting themselves as police officers approaching foreigners to check documents or foreign currency in order to rob them.
Avoid non-essential travel to the city of Cali and most rural areas of Colombia, because of the constantly changing security situation and the difficulty for the Colombian authorities to secure all of its territory. The exception to this would be some parts of the coffee growing area southwest of Bogotá (Risaralda, Quindio and Caldas), and resort areas with established tourist industries, such as the Rosario Islands off the Atlantic coast and the Amazon resorts near Leticia.
We advise against all travel to the departments of Putumayo and Nariño (excluding Pasto), located along the border with Ecuador, and to the departments of Arauca, Santander and Norte de Santander (excluding Cucuta), located along the border with Venezuela. The presence of armed drug traffickers, guerrilla and paramilitary organizations, including the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) and the ELN (National Liberation Army), poses a major risk to travellers. These groups continue to perpetrate attacks, extortion, kidnappings, car bombings, and damages to infrastructure in these areas. Landmines are used by guerrilla groups, especially in rural areas.
You are also advised against all travel to the departments of Cauca, Caqueta, Guaviare, Valle de Cauca (excluding Cali) and Antioquia (excluding Medellin), to the southern parts of Meta department and to the city of Buenaventura, due to the presence of similar armed groups.

Comoros: Do not travel (26 Mar 2008)

We strongly advise you not to travel to the Comoros island of Anjouan because of heightened political tension and the unpredictable security situation. On 25 March 2008, control of the Comoros island of Anjouan was restored to the Union of Comoros following military action which removed the former Anjouan President, Mohamed Bacar.
We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to the islands of Grand Comore and Moheli due to the likelihood of further violent demonstrations against French and western interests pending the resolution of Bacar's asylum claim with France and the criminal case against him in Comoros.

Congo (Brazzaville): Avoid non-essential travel (27 Nov 2007)

We advise against non-essential travel to the Republic of Congo, except for the cities of Brazzaville and Pointe-Noire (see below). Due to insecurity in the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), you should use extreme caution if travelling to the border areas in northern Congo along the Ubangui River. The presence of DRC refugees in Impfondo and in other towns and villages along the banks of the river may cause serious tensions. Sporadic fighting occurs in the Pool region, which includes the capital, Brazzaville, and east of Bouenza.
Business visitors should travel to the Republic of Congo only if they have assistance from their hosts and/or local authorities. The security situation remains unpredictable.
You are advised to exercise a high degree of caution when travelling to the capital, Brazzaville, and to Pointe-Noire. Travel between Brazzaville and Pointe-Noire should be by air.

Congo (Kinshasa): Avoid non-essential travel (18 Apr 2008)

The general political and security situation remains dangerous, unpredictable and unstable. There is a potential for civil unrest. Curfews could be imposed without warning. Travellers should avoid large gatherings and public places where violence could occur.
Travellers going to Kinshasa should make sure someone will be meeting them upon arrival.
We advise against all travel to eastern and north-eastern areas of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), including points of entry from Uganda or Rwanda, except for the city of Bukavu where the situation is somewhat safer, but non-essential travel should still be avoided. The DRC borders with Rwanda and Uganda can close on short notice due to continuing insecurity and lawlessness in these areas.
You are advised against all travel to the Kivus, where armed militias remain active. Attacks on civilians in the area are frequently reported. Fighting involving militias has caused tens of thousands of people to flee their towns or villages. The UN Mission to the DRC (MONUC) and the Armed Forces of the DRC have stepped up aggressive military operations in the area. Humanitarian workers and UN personnel are also subject to attacks and in the past, violent demonstrations have been raised against them. Several local NGOs have suspended or reduced operations.
You are advised against all travel to the Ituri district of Orientale Province, in the north-east of the country, where the situation is still extremely insecure, in spite of progress made in disarming militia groups. Outside of the main town, Bunia, government administrative or security structures are weak.
You are also advised against all travel to Bas-Congo, in the west of the country, where there have been recent clashes between followers of the political religious group Bundu dia Kongo (BDK) and security forces.

East Timor: Avoid non-essential travel (29 Apr 2008)

We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to East Timor at this time because of the fragile security situation and the risk of violent civil unrest. The situation could deteriorate without warning. There is a possibility that Australians and Australian interests may be specifically targeted.
On February 11, 2008 President Jose Ramos-Horta was shot during an attack on his home. An attack on at least one other government official has been reported. Local reaction to these events is unpredictable and may turn violent with little notice. A country-wide state of emergency, which was declared on February 11, 2008, was lifted on April 22, 2008. However, a state of siege remains in effect in the Ermera district. A curfew from 22:00 to 06:00 has been imposed for Emera and restrictions on public gatherings and protests remain in place.
The attack on the President follows a prolonged period of civil unrest during which roadblocks have been set up and clashes have occurred between protesters and international police officers throughout the capital.
Such incidents may affect transportation routes and land border crossings as well as flights in and out of Dili’s airport. Previously, violence has occurred in the vicinity of Dili’s Comoro airport, areas surrounding IDP (internally displaced persons) camps, and at food storage warehouses. Reports suggest an increase in gang-related violence, arson and vandalism. Travellers are advised to avoid unnecessary local travel and exercise extreme caution.
Violence occurs in many areas of the country, with demonstrations being held and buildings being burned. Travellers should avoid large gatherings and public areas where demonstrations could occur, such as symbols and institutions of the Government of Timor-Leste, and follow the advice of local authorities.

Ecuador: Exercise high degree of caution (June 06, 2008)

Demonstrations are a frequent occurrence in Ecuador. Protests often include roadblocks and may disrupt travel. Canadians should not attempt to cross blockades, even if they appear unattended.
You should avoid public demonstrations and large public gatherings throughout Ecuador as they may become violent.
Foreigners participating in public demonstrations may be detained and/or deported.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the areas immediately bordering Colombia (namely both provinces of Carchi and Sucumbíos, with the exception of the city of Tulcán), and the town of San Lorenzo, located in the north of Esmeraldas province. Travel to and within these areas is dangerous due to the presence of drug traffickers, criminal organizations and refugees from Colombia, and to the risk of violence, including during demonstrations, kidnappings, armed assaults, and extortion.

Eritrea: Avoid non-essential travel (June 12, 2008)

The political climate is highly unstable due to the tensions between Eritrea and Ethiopia. Violence could erupt without notice. Travellers should maintain a high level of security awareness at all times and avoid public gatherings and street demonstrations.
On June 10, 2008, an exchange of fire occurred between the Djiboutian military and Eritrean troops along the Djibouti-Eritrea border. Further violence is possible.
We strongly advise you not to travel Outside the city of Asmara: as of June 1st, 2006, all foreign nationals (including resident diplomats) are required to obtain a travel permit from the Government of the State of Eritrea (GSE) for any travel outside Asmara. Foreign nationals residing or working outside Asmara will also require a travel permit to travel outside their area of residence or work. Applications for travel permits will be processed by the Department of Protocol in Asmara and by Zonal Administration Offices (for foreign nationals working in other areas outside Asmara).
We strongly advise you not to travel to the regions bordering Ethiopia: the border between Eritrea and Ethiopia is closed, and adjacent areas are part of a special security zone under the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement, which stretches 25 km north into Eritrea.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the regions bordering Sudan: the border with Sudan remains closed and you are advised against all travel to the border area. You should not cross the border into Sudan. The situation in eastern Sudan remains unstable.

Ethiopia: Reconsider your need to travel (June 13, 2008)

Bombings occurred in the capital, Addis Ababa, in April and May 2008. Travellers should maintain a high level of security awareness at all times and avoid public gatherings and street demonstrations.
We advise against all travel to the border area with Eritrea and the Danakil Desert area bounded by the Dessie-Adigrat road, the Dessie-Djibouti road and the Ethio-Eritrean border. The border between Eritrea and Ethiopia is closed, and adjacent areas are part of a special security zone under the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement. A strict no-fly zone is in effect between Ethiopia and Eritrea for all aircraft, other than those of the United Nations.
You are also advised against all travel to the east and south of Jijiga in the Ogaden and Hararge areas toward the Somali border, where ongoing military operations and the presence of landmines have been reported.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the border areas with Kenya, where armed clashes involving Ethiopian and Kenyan security forces periodically raise tensions and have caused hundreds of civilians to flee their homes. Cases of cross-border banditry related to the drought in the region have increased. Armed groups hostile to the Government of Ethiopia operate in several areas near the border with Kenya.
Recent credible information indicates terrorists may be planning attacks in the eastern Ethiopian city of Jijiga. Possible targets include hotels. Information indicates terrorists may also be planning attacks in the eastern Ethiopian city of Dire Dawa.

Georgia: Exercise high degree of caution (May 02, 2008)

Mikhail Saakashvili was re-elected President on January 5, 2008, and the country is headed for the polls again on May 21 for parliamentary elections. The campaign atmosphere is expected to be tense. Opposition parties took exception to the outcome of the presidential election and staged peaceful political protests in Tbilisi, causing sporadic traffic disruptions. In early November 2007, opposition-led demonstrations gave rise to violent confrontations with the police, and a nationwide state of emergency was imposed and then lifted on November 16, 2007.
Avoid all travel to the breakaway region of South Ossetia or the surrounding region. On February 1, 2005, a car bomb exploded in the city of Gori, killing at least four persons and injuring 10. Political tensions have also mounted with the deployment of approximately 2,000 Georgian troops to the region in an attempt to bring South Ossetia under central government control. Deaths and injuries have resulted from fighting between Georgian and separatist forces near the Ossetian capital, Tskhinvali. On August 20, 2004, Georgian troops withdrew from positions captured in South Ossetia. A peacekeeping force is occupying the region.
On April 29, 2008, Russia indicated that it would increase its military presence in South Ossetia and Abkhazia. You are advised against all travel these two regions due to the increased risk caused by the conflict. You are also advised against to avoid all travel to the Zugdidi and Tsalenjikha districts of the Samegrelo region, the Svaneti region, or Pankisi Gorge beyond Akhmeta. Avoid the Georgian Military Highway north of Gudauri. Travel to other areas outside the Georgian capital, Tbilisi, is possible, but security is uncertain. Verify the current security situation with local authorities in specific areas prior to travel.
The Abkhazia region remains under control of the self-proclaimed Republic of Abkhazia. Terrorist activities (road mines, assassinations, kidnappings, and bombings) continue in the region. Abkhaz "border officials" may demand that visitors to this region purchase a "visa".
Do not enter or leave the country via the land border with the Russian Federation, specifically through Chechnya, Dagestan, Ingushetia, North Ossetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, or Karachay-Cherkessia. Kidnapping occurs in these areas. Cross-border traffic with Azerbaijan may be subject to significant delays at customs checks.

Guinea: Exercise high degree of caution (Feb 05, 2008)

Guinea is experiencing a large-scale movement of military protests in Conakry and in other cities. Soldiers are demanding unpaid salary arrears and are accusing senior officers of embezzlement. Dissatisfaction on the part of Guinean soldiers led to violent revolts in May 2007. Recently, soldiers threatened to stage further protests if their demands are not met.
Public disturbances could break out throughout the country at any time. Canadians should avoid large crowds and public areas where violence could take place, monitor news reports and follow the advice of local authorities.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the border regions with Sierra Leone, Liberia and Cote d'Ivoire because of the unsettled security situation in these areas resulting from problems in neighbouring countries and the risk of banditry and armed rebel activity.
We also strongly advise you not to travel to the Guinea Forestiere region around Nzerekore in the south because of the risk of ethnic violence.

Guinea-Bissau: Exercise high degree of caution (Nov 27, 2007)

You are advised to exercise a high degree of caution in the country. Travellers should maintain a high level of security awareness at all times and avoid public gatherings and street demonstrations.
We advise against all travel to the northwest part of the country that borders the Casamance region including the San Domingos/Mpack road. The northwest portion of the country, bordering on Senegal, has long been the scene of clashes between Guinea-Bissau's army and Casamance rebels, who have been driven off Guinean soil since 2002. It would be dangerous to cross this border by land. Attacks in this region have resumed since March 2006, causing the displacement of thousands of residents. The road between San Domingos and Varela has been closed because of the presence of landmines. Small arms proliferation is rampant in this conflict zone, and consequently there are many hold-ups. Further serious tensions are expected, as the government increased security measures and the deployment of soldiers along the border.

Haiti: Avoid non-essential travel (May 21, 2008)

We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Haiti at this time because of ongoing political instability, lawlessness and high levels of serious crime.
If you do decide to travel to Haiti, you should exercise extreme caution.
You should remain indoors during political rallies and demonstrations, refrain from travelling and avoid public areas until the situation improves. Curfews may be imposed.
Despite improvement since early 2007, the situation is relatively dangerous throughout the country owing to criminal activity combined with the difficulties the police have in organizing themselves and ensuring order. Personal safety cannot be guaranteed by local authorities, and police presence is not guaranteed in all cities. In most cities, the police are unable to respond in a timely manner to calls for assistance. It is strongly advised to avoid going out after nightfall, especially in the areas most at risk. In the Gonaïves region, Trou du Nord, the Cap-Haïtien region, and in the neighbourhoods of Martissant, Carrefour, Bel Air, Sonapi and Cité Soleil in the Port-au-Prince area, the security situation is particularly unstable and dangerous.
No public transport of any kind is recommended.
Avoid walking alone at all times. Keep car windows closed and doors locked when travelling. Avoid showing visible signs of affluence, such as wearing expensive-looking jewellery or cameras. Remain cautious with new acquaintances offering friendship or hospitality. Foreigners are viewed as wealthy and have been robbed, kidnapped and murdered. Travellers should comply and not resist if attacked.

India: Exercise high degree of caution (June 11, 2008)

Travellers should maintain a high level of security awareness at all times and avoid public gatherings and street demonstrations.
An indefinite general strike was launched on June 9, 2008, affecting the districts of Darjeeling, Kalimpong and Kurseong. Darjeeling has been closed to tourists and any tourists currently in the region have been forced to leave. Small violent clashes have been reported and further violent incidents are possible. You should keep informed of the situation and follow the advice of local authorities.
In 2008 terrorism remains a threat throughout India. Cities such as New Delhi, Mumbai, Hyderabad and Varanasi may be placed on heightened alert by local authorities on short notice. An increased police presence and tighter security restrictions may be imposed. Travellers should follow the advice of local authorities.
Pay close attention to your personal security at all times and monitor the media and other local information sources for information about possible new safety or security risks.
Recent credible information indicates that Mumbai, New Delhi, Chennai and Kolkata may be the targets of terrorist attacks and, more specifically, that terrorists are planning to conduct suicide attacks in Mumbai or New Delhi. On 23 November 2007, bombs targeting local courts exploded in Lucknow, Farizabad and Varanasi in the state of Uttar Pradesh.
You should be particularly vigilant in the lead up to and on days of national significance such as Republic Day (26 January) and Independence Day (15 August), as militants have used such occasions to mount attacks.
Avoid non-essential travel to the northeastern states of Manipur, Tripura, Meghalaya and Nagaland, due to armed robbery, kidnapping and terrorist activities. Insurgent groups have launched attacks on public buildings and public transportation.
Avoid all travel to Jammu and Kashmir, with the exception of Ladakh via Manali or by air to Leh, due to on-going conflict and terrorist violence; to the border areas of Arunachal Pradesh, Assam and West Bengal due to frequent violent attacks; to the border areas of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab, and areas of Ladakh within the immediate vicinity of the Line of Control (the military control line between India and Pakistan: landmines and unexploded munitions along the border constitute a risk.)

Indonesia: Avoid non-essential travel (June 06, 2008)

We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Indonesia, including Bali, at this time due to the very high threat of terrorist attack. We continue to receive reports indicating that terrorists are planning attacks against a range of targets, including Western interests and places frequented by foreigners. If you are in Indonesia, including Bali, and are concerned for your safety you should consider departing. If you do decide to travel to Indonesia, including Bali, you should exercise extreme caution.
Terrorist attacks against Westerners in Bali and Jakarta indicate that these areas are a priority target for terrorists in Indonesia. Suicide attacks against locations frequented by foreigners in Bali and Jakarta have killed and injured many people. Locations that might be targets include Jakarta, Bali and Batam. However, terrorist attacks could occur at any time, anywhere in Indonesia against a wide range of possible targets, in particular places frequented by foreigners.
We strongly advise you not travel to Central and West Sulawesi (Religious tensions and conflict around Poso have increased: the situation remains tense in Palu, Poso and Tentena) and to Maluku (in particular Ambon): tension between Christian and Muslim groups in Ambon has resulted in frequent occurrences of violence since April 2004.

Iran: Exercise high degree of caution (June 13, 2008)

Heightened tensions throughout the region, together with increased threats globally from terrorism, put foreigners at greater risk. Acts of political violence, including assassinations of political figures and bomb attacks against the Iranian Government, have occurred in the past.
Acts of political violence occur throughout Iran, including in the capital, Tehran, including bomb attacks against both foreign targets and Iranian government establishments.
The security situation in Iran remains stable, although civil disobedience appears to be on the rise. Personal safety risks have not increased.
We strongly advise you not to travel to areas near the borders between Iran and Iraq, particularly in Ilam province and Khorramshahr in Khuzestan province, because of the extremely dangerous security situation.
We strongly advise you not to travel to any area in Kerman province east of the city of Kerman (including the city of Bam), Sistan and Baluchestan province and areas near the border with Afghanistan in Khorasan-e-Razavi and Khorasan-e-Jonubi province due to the unpredictable security situation.

Iraq: Avoid all travel (June 12, 2008)

The security situation in Iraq remains dangerous and unpredictable. The threat to foreigners is very high. If you are in Iraq and are concerned for your safety, you should consider leaving.
Terrorist attacks can occur at any time, anywhere in Iraq. We continue to receive a stream of reporting indicating that terrorists and anti-government forces are in the advanced stages of planning attacks against a range of targets, including places frequented by foreigners.
Terrorist attacks, including those against civilians using roadside bombs, suicide vests and car bombs, are directed at destabilising the Iraqi government and forcing the withdrawal of Coalition forces and are likely to continue. Rocket and mortar attacks, including in the International Zone in Baghdad, occur without warning.
Kidnappings and hostage taking are common in Iraq and may be fatal. A significant number of foreign nationals have been kidnapped and killed. Recent reports indicate that a number of foreign nationals working in Iraq continue to be at risk of being kidnapped or assassinated.
Travel by road is not safe. The road between Baghdad and Baghdad International Airport ('Route Irish') is extremely hazardous, with a high frequency of attacks against Coalition vehicles, civilians and foreigners.
Although travel at night is especially dangerous, attacks are also common during the day.
We advise against non-essential travel to the provinces of Dahuk, Erbil, and Sulaymaniyah, which are under the control of the Kurdistan Regional Government. Border areas with Turkey and Iran should be avoided at all times.

Israel: Exercise high degree of caution (May 05, 2008)

Terrorist attacks in Israel, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip, in addition to ongoing military operations and heightened tensions throughout the region, put travellers visiting the region at risk. Exercise appropriate caution and avoid large gatherings, crowded places, and demonstrations, as well as proximity to other possible targets, including pedestrian promenades, shopping malls, open markets, restaurants, discotheques, bus stations, and public transportation.
In past years, security incidents have occurred in a variety of locations in Tel Aviv, Haifa, Beersheba, Netanya, West Jerusalem, and other major population centres. Incidents have occurred in areas frequented by foreigners, some of whom have been killed or injured. For example, the Carmel Market in Tel Aviv and the intersection of Jaffa and King George streets and the adjoining Ben Yehuda Pedestrian Mall in Jerusalem have been targeted in the past. Avoid crowded places and do not use public surface transportation.
There are live landmines in certain areas, including in parts of the West Bank and along Israel's borders. Some minefields have not been clearly marked or fenced. Visitors should walk only on established roads or trails.
We advise against non-essential travel to the regions near the border between Israel and Lebanon.
Avoid all travel to the region surrounding the Gaza Strip due to ongoing military activity. In southern Israel, rockets fired from the Gaza Strip, which can have a ranging capability of over 5 km, have reached as far as Ashqelon and Sderot. Recent attacks have also targeted Erez Border Crossing. Due to recent events, local authorities have warned against travel to the region near the Israel-Egypt border on the Sinai, and implemented closures of roads and tourist areas.
Avoid all travel to the Gaza Strip. The security situation in the Gaza Strip is dangerous, unpredictable and could deteriorate at any time as a result of Israeli military operations or intra-Palestinian armed conflict. If you are in the Gaza Strip, you should remain in a secure location indoors and monitor the media for information. You should consider leaving immediately if it is safe to do so.
Avoid all travel to the West Bank, excluding Ramallah, Jericho and Bethlehem. The West Bank continues to be affected by inter-factional tension and the situation could deteriorate rapidly in reaction to developments in Gaza.
Avoid non-essential travel to the cities of Ramallah, Jericho and Bethlehem. The level of violence in these three cities has remained relatively low compared to other areas of the West Bank in recent years. However, the potential for political demonstrations and military incursions remain. Only essential travel to these cities should be considered, and only during daytime. It is not recommended to stay overnight in these areas.

Ivory Coast: Exercise high degree of caution (June 09, 2008)

We advise you to exercise a high degree of caution in Ivory Coast because of the unpredictable security environment and the risk of serious crime.
Following an agreement between the main factions in March 2007 after several years of civil conflict and unrest, the political situation in Ivory Coast has improved and tensions have eased. However, the security situation remains volatile and the potential for unrest and a sudden deterioration of law and order remains.
You should avoid protests and demonstrations throughout Ivory Coast as they may become violent.
There is a heavy UN troop presence throughout the southern part of the country, including in the capital, Abidjan.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the Dix-Huit Montagnes and Moyen-Cavally regions of western Ivory Coast and the city of Bouake because of the particularly unsettled and dangerous security situation in those parts of the country.

Kenya: Exercise high degree of caution (Apr 24, 2008)

The December 27th elections led to two months of severe post-election violence in Kenya. On February 28, 2008, President Kibaki and opposition leader Raila Odinga signed an agreement calling for a coalition government, putting an end to the political crisis. The new cabinet was announced on April 13, 2008.
The situation remains calm across Kenya with all major highways open. Travellers intending to travel by road should plan their trip carefully and verify the road conditions prior to departure to ensure a safe journey. They should avoid any inter-city travel by night. There have been several reports of illegal roadblocks erected throughout the country where cash is demanded to ensure safe passage.
Rift Valley, Western, and Nyanza provinces have been relatively calm.
Both domestic and international flights are operating normally and the roads leading to the airports in Nairobi and Mombasa are open.
You should avoid all demonstrations, political rallies and large public gatherings because of their potential to turn violent.
We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Kisumu in Nyanza Province and the Nairobi suburb of Kibera. Following the breakdown of talks on the formation of a new cabinet, isolated violent incidents and road blocks have been reported in these areas.
We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to the Nairobi suburbs of Kibera, Mathare, Kasirani and Eastleigh due to high crime levels.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the border regions with Ethiopia, Sudan and Somalia because of the extremely dangerous security situation. Cross border violence occurs, including kidnapping, armed banditry, and violent tribal and clan disputes. Kenya's border with Somalia was closed on 3 January 2007 due to increased instability in Somalia.

Lebanon: Avoid non-essential travel (May 29, 2008)

We advise you against non-essential travel to Lebanon.Government and opposition leaders reached an agreement on May 21, 2008, in Doha to elect a new president and form a national unity government. On May 25, 2008, Gen. Michel Suleiman was elected the new President of Lebanon following a six-month political crisis. During this period, violence between opposition and pro-government groups erupted throughout Lebanon, resulting in over 80 deaths and many more injuries. Demonstrations have now ended in downtown Beirut and access routes to the airport have reopened. Although the violence has decreased, Canadians should continue to monitor the situation, maintain a high level of personal security awareness at all times, monitor local media for current information, follow the advice of local authorities, ensure that all their identification and travel documents are up-to-date, and avoid all political gatherings and demonstrations.
In the last three years, a series of bombings, grenade attacks and political assassinations have taken place in different areas of Lebanon, including commercial and residential districts in and around Beirut, resulting in numerous deaths and injuring more than a hundred people. Similar incidents could occur without warning, particularly in places frequented by foreigners, such as commercial establishments, public places, hotels, tourist sites, as well as residential areas.
Although fighting in the Nahr al-Bared refugee camp in the north of Tripoli (northern Lebanon) has ended, the situation in this region remains unpredictable, and could deteriorate without warning. Clashes and bombings between Lebanese military and security forces and extremist militants resulted in a significant number of casualties.
We strongly advise you not to travel south of the Litani River, the Bekaa Valley and Mount Lebanon due to the uncertain security environment and danger posed by landmines and unexploded ordnance. The situation could change without notice and Australians could be caught up in violence directed at others.
There are significant numbers of unexploded ordnance, including cluster bombs, and landmines in Lebanon, particularly in southern Lebanon.

Liberia: Avoid non-essential travel (Apr 24, 2008)

The country is still recovering from a devastating civil war, which began in 1999 and ended in August 2003, when a comprehensive peace agreement was signed. A transitional power-sharing government has been in place until the actual president was elected in November 2005. No major security problems were reported during the 2005 elections, and the general tensions that surrounded the event have now largely subsided. The United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) has now completed its disarmament program. Social and economic infrastructure reconstruction is ongoing and progress has been made in resettling refugees and displaced persons from neighbouring countries, reintegrating former combatants, respecting human rights and the rule of law, creating a stable environment and paving the way for economic development and fighting corruption.
However, the security situation in Liberia remains unpredictable. Mass movement of people aggravates the already poor economic conditions, especially in Monrovia and in other cities, where the presence of refugees is putting a strain on food and shelter resources. Looting and robbery, often at gunpoint, is being reported throughout the country. Fighting and demonstrations can occur anywhere at any time.
Avoid unnecessary travel to the areas bordering Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Ivory Coast, where the presence of rebels and refugees contributes to instabilities.

Libya: Exercise high degree of caution (May 13, 2008)

Travellers to Libya should exercise a high degree of caution, when travelling on routes near the Niger, Chad, and Sudan borders. These regions are notorious for armed highway bandits, or "coupeurs de routes". You should carry travel documents at all times.
Avoid non-essential travel to the border areas with Chad and Sudan. The border between Libya and these countries continues to be closed.

Malaysia: Exercise caution (Mar 17, 2008)

There is a heightened threat of terrorism throughout Southeast Asia, including Malaysia.
Exercise caution, particularly in commercial and public establishments (hotels, clubs, restaurants, bars, schools, places of worship, outdoor recreation events) and tourist areas frequented by foreigners.
Avoid non-essential travel to the islands off the east coast of Sabah, including Sipadan and Langkayan islands where the kidnapping of foreigners has occurred in the past. Malaysian authorities have increased security in the region in response to past incidents. Credible reports indicate that there continues to be a high risk of kidnappings of foreigners.

Mali: Exercise high degree of caution (June 04, 2008)

Demonstrations took place in Bamako in response to the high cost of living, and more are expected in the coming weeks. Although demonstrations have been peaceful until now, there is a risk that they could become confrontational or violent.
We advise you to exercise a high degree of caution in Mali because of banditry and the activities of armed terrorist groups, particularly in the northern part of the country. You should be aware that terrorist targets could include places frequented by foreigners and identified with western interests.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the northern part of Mali, including Timbuktu, Gao and Kidal, and the border areas with Mauritania, Algeria and Niger, because of the risk of banditry, kidnapping and the activities of armed extremist groups. Tuareg rebels from Niger and northern Mali kidnapped several soldiers and civilians in late August 2007 and are reported to be planning further attacks against military facilities in the region.

Niger: Exercise high degree of caution (Mar 17, 2008)

We advise you to exercise a high degree of caution in Niger because of high levels of serious crime.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the Departments of Agadez, Diffa, Zinder and Maradi, and north of the city of Abalack in the Department of Tahoua because of the risk of armed banditry, the activities of armed extremist groups and clashes between security forces of Niger and rebel groups.

Nigeria: Avoid non-essential travel (May 20, 2008)

We advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Nigeria at this time due to the high threat of terrorist attack and risk of kidnapping, the unpredictable security situation and the heightened risk of violent civil unrest. The security situation could deteriorate without warning.
If you do decide to travel to Nigeria, you should exercise extreme caution.
Large, violent demonstrations resulting in deaths have occurred in Nigeria. You should avoid all protests, rallies and demonstrations as they may turn violent.
We strongly advise you not to travel to the riverine area in Bayelsa, Delta, Rivers (including Port Harcourt and Bonny Island), Cross River, Akwa Ibom and Anambra States in south-eastern Nigeria because of the high risk of kidnapping, armed robbery and other armed attacks against foreign oil companies in the area and localised violent civil unrest.
There is a risk of violent attack by armed militants in Delta, Bayelsa, Rivers and Akwa Ibom states. Conflict between the Nigerian military and militants is continuing in the Warri area of Delta state.
Militants have significantly increased their kidnappings of expatriate oil workers and foreign businessmen in the Niger Delta region and from offshore facilities and ships.

Pakistan: Avoid non-essential travel (June 13, 2008)

We strongly advise you to reconsider your need to travel to Pakistan at this time due to the very high threat of terrorist attack, sectarian violence and the unpredictable security situation. If you do decide to travel to Pakistan, you should exercise extreme caution. If you are in Pakistan and concerned for your safety, you should consider leaving if it is safe to do so.
We continue to receive a stream of credible reports indicating terrorists are in the advanced stages of planning attacks. These attacks could target Western interests and individuals and places frequented by foreigners and could occur at any time. Attacks may be launched anywhere in Pakistan, including major cities.
Violence and civil unrest have surged since the end of the siege at the Red Mosque complex (Lal Masjid) in Islamabad in July 2007. Recent credible reports indicate that terrorists may be planning retaliatory attacks on aviation, government and military targets, as well as Western interests, including Australian interests, and Western embassies. Since 12 July 2007, more than 400 people, most of them police and troops, have been killed in suicide attacks and shootings.
We strongly urge you to avoid all demonstrations, rallies and public gatherings. The release of a film by Netherlands politician Geert Wilders and the recent republication of cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammed in Danish newspapers have led to protests in Pakistan. You could be caught up in violence or attacks directed at others. If you are in an area affected by demonstrations, you should find a safe location, remain indoors and heed local advice. You should continue to closely monitor local information sources for information about possible safety and security risks.
Recent credible information indicates terrorists are planning attacks against targets in Karachi. Consulates may be targeted, as well as major international hotels.
Credible reporting indicates potential terrorist threats against Western hotels in Islamabad and Islamabad supermarkets frequented by Western diplomats.
We advise against all travel to areas reporting military or militant activity and all border areas except for official border crossing points; the Kashmir region (including Azad Kashmir); the province of Balochistan, excluding the city of Quetta; the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), including Swat but excluding the city of Peshawar; and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).
The security situation in Swat is volatile and road travel to Gilgit, Swat and Chitral should be avoided for the same reasons.
Sectarian violence is a serious problem throughout Pakistan, but particularly in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). There have been outbreaks of ethnic and sectarian violence including bombings, shootings, and mass demonstrations, resulting in deaths and the imposition of curfews.
There are restrictions for foreigners travelling to the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) along the Afghan border as well as the area in the disputed territory of Kashmir, Line of Control (LOC).
If you are travelling to Hunza via the Karakoram highway we strongly advise you to travel only during daylight hours. Sections of the road are very narrow with precipitous drops and sometimes partially obstructed by rock and earth slides.

Philippines: Exercise high degree of caution (June 02, 2008)

Continuing reports suggest that there is an ongoing terrorist threat to Westerners and Western interests in the Philippines. Philippine authorities have warned that there may be bomb attacks in Manila and other key cities. Visitors can expect to be subject to frequent security checks at public and private facilities, including shopping malls and public transportation. Despite a number of highly publicized arrests of persons allegedly associated with terrorist groups, the threat of terrorist actions remains. Travel at night outside of metropolitan areas should be avoided, particularly in Mindanao.
Bombings and crime-related shootings have occurred in Mindanao, Manila and other parts of the country, and explosive devices continue to be discovered by security authorities.
Travellers should be vigilant and comply with all security procedures. Any suspicious looking packages or behaviour should be reported immediately to the nearest security authority.

Somalia: Avoid all travel (May 13, 2008)

We strongly advise you not to travel to Somalia because of widespread armed conflict, very high threat of terrorist attack against western interests and dangerous levels of violent crime.
Due to the extremely dangerous security situation and breakdown in law and order, you should consider leaving Somalia if it is safe to do so.
There is a very high threat of terrorist attack in Somalia. Westerners have been targeted and killed in terrorist attacks throughout Somalia, including Mogadishu. Foreigners have been kidnapped. In early May 2008, terrorists threatened attacks against foreign individuals, government interests and security personnel.
Somali government forces and Ethiopian troops have been involved in frequent violent clashes with militant insurgents since December 2006. These clashes appear to be escalating. Firearm, grenade and landmine attacks on security forces are common. Civilians have been killed and injured.
You should be aware that anti-Western sentiments are strong in many parts of the country. Violent demonstrations, attacks (possibly targeting foreigners) and armed military activity can occur at any time.
Somaliland, a self-declared republic in the northwest, is seeking independence. Puntland, an administrative region in the northeast, is operating as a separate entity. Somaliland and Puntland operate autonomously and some parts of these regions have had periods of slightly more stability than the south-central part of the country, however violent incidents and targeting of humanitarian workers has occurred. It is also possible that tensions and escalating violence in the south of the country can spread to Somaliland and Puntland at any time. There continues to be tension between Somaliland and Puntland over the regions of Sool and Sanaag.

Sri-Lanka: Avoid non-essential travel (June 09, 2008)

Violent attacks, resulting in numerous deaths and casualties, have been occurring with increasing frequency in 2008. Victims have included military personnel, government officials and civilians. Bombings have taken place in a variety of cities, including Colombo. In the days surrounding Sri Lanka's Independence Day, on February 4, 2008, explosions took place at several different locations across the country including the Colombo Fort Railway Station, the Colombo zoo, and on the route between Anuradhupura and Janakapura.
You should avoid any travel on public buses or trains as these have recently been targets of attacks. They should maintain a high level of personal security awareness at all times, monitor local news reports, and follow the advice of local authorities.
Conflict between the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) and the Sri Lanka Army has lead to a number of violent attacks throughout the country. In 2006 and 2007, there have been an increasing number of violent incidents in the south, including several bomb attacks in Colombo. Recent unrest has caused several deaths and numerous injuries. A state of emergency is in effect throughout the country. As a result, there is a heightened security force presence, including checkpoints, throughout the country. Travellers are advised to carry personal identification at all times and comply with government and security force instructions.
Tensions between the Government of Sri Lanka and the LTTE are high. The number of violent attacks causing deaths has increased since the Sri Lankan government announced its withdrawal from the cease-fire agreement established with the LTTE in 2002. While foreigners have not been targeted in the specific attacks, explosions have occurred in public areas including on the road from the capital to the airport. The security situation could deteriorate quickly and without warning.
In January 2008, several violent attacks have occurred causing injuries and fatalities. Victims have included military personal, government officials and civilians. Bombings have taken place in a variety of cities, including Colombo.
On November 28, 2007, an explosion occurred outside a retail shop in Nugegoda, a suburb south of Colombo. Reports indicate that 17 people have been killed and several more were injured. Canadians are reminded that unattended packages should be treated with caution and reported to authorities. On the same day, a female suicide bomber attempted to assassinate the Minister of Social Security in Colombo. The bomber and a Ministerial aide were killed in the attack.
On October 16, 2007, an attack took place in Yala National Park and several soldiers were killed. The park was closed for several months following the attack but it has since re-opened. On May 28, 2007, an explosion occurred south of Colombo killing eight people and injuring more than thirty others. On May 24, a military vehicle was attacked near the port of Colombo. Two people were killed and at least ten were injured. On March 26, 2007, the LTTE launched an assault on the military’s Katunayake air force base located adjacent to the Bandaranaike International Airport (BIA), 20 km from Colombo. The violence was not targeted at the passenger terminal and no civilians were injured in the attack.
Recent attacks resulted in a disruption to airline travel and the cancellation of some flights. Due to sporadic violent events, roads in and around Colombo and in the North and East may be closed with little notice.
Avoid all travel to Wilpattu National Park in northwestern Sri Lanka where tourists were killed in a landmine explosion in May 2006. You are also advised against all travel to Yala National Park, located on the southeastern region of the country, due to recent violent attacks.

Sudan: Avoid all travel (June 11, 2008)

We strongly advise you not to travel outside of Khartoum because of the extremely dangerous security situation and the high risk of violent crime and civil unrest. Conflict can escalate and curfews can be imposed with little or no warning. Landmines have been laid in rural areas in many parts of the country.
We advise you not to travel to the capital Khartoum because of armed conflict and the high threat of terrorist attack. Rebels from the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) launched an attack on Omdurman, a city close to Khartoum, on 10 May 2008. Media reports indicate a curfew is in place in Omdurman and Khartoum International Airport is closed. We strongly urge you to remain indoors in a safe location and monitor the media for new security threats.
If you are outside of Khartoum, you should consider leaving if it is safe to do so.
The security situation in Sudan, including the Darfur region, is extremely dangerous and volatile. Civilians, including foreign aid workers and journalists, are at extreme risk of being caught up in the violence between the various factions. Armed conflict, banditry, kidnapping, lawlessness and other criminal activity have also increased. You should ensure you have personal security measures in place and monitor the media for information about possible new safety or security risks.
Politically-motivated demonstrations and rallies occur. You should avoid all rallies and demonstrations as participants and bystanders have been killed.

Yemen: Avoid all travel (June 02, 2008)

The security situation in Yemen is deteriorating, as evidenced by a recent increase in terrorist attacks. There is a high risk of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The level of risk to foreigners is very high. Terrorist attacks have occurred, among other places, at tourist sites, bars, hotels, government buildings, oil installations, and Western embassies as well as against convoys on the road. There are reports that many organizations and embassies have been evacuating non-essential staff. Heightened security measures are in place throughout Yemen, especially in areas frequented by tourists.
On April 10, 2008, one small explosive device detonated near the offices of Nexen, a Canadian oil company, in the Hadda district, in Sana’a. No casualties or damage were reported. Another small explosive device was also found, but disarmed by the authorities. One person was killed and several others were injured in a mortar attack near a girls’ primary school and the American Embassy in Sana’a on March 18, 2008. On January 18, 2008, two Belgian tourists were killed and four others seriously injured during an ambush in the eastern province of Hadramout. And on July 2, 2007, a terrorist attack at a popular tourist site in Ma'rib resulted in the deaths of eight foreign tourists and two Yemeni citizens.

Zimbabwe: Avoid non-essential travel (June 11, 2008)

The presidential run-off election has been scheduled for June 27, 2008. The situation remains volatile and unpredictable in the country. Numerous incidents of political violence have been reported in rural areas where ongoing intimidation and violence has resulted in the hospitalization of victims of beatings; displaced families following the burning of their houses; and terrorized civilians. The main perpetrators are the so-called "war veterans", youth militias and army personnel. While the Zimbabwean Republican Police is usually not directly involved in these activities, Travellers should not rely on them for protection due to their limited power of intervention. Roadblocks have been erected in many locations around the country and the type of controls may vary significantly from one to another. Travellers should be very cooperative at all times. Residents and visitors could be subject of arbitrary detention or arrest. Canadians should avoid non-essential travel, particularly in rural areas. Canadians should also have their travel documents such as passport, visas and vehicle police clearance certificate with them at all times.
The risk of civil unrest has significantly increased, particularly in the downtown cores and low-income suburbs of major cities. There is a potential for sudden outbreaks of violence, as demonstrated by recent events. Canadians in Zimbabwe should maintain a very high level of personal security awareness, monitor local news reports closely, and avoid travelling after dark. Large crowds or gatherings, particularly political meetings or rallies, should also be avoided. Canadians are also advised to maintain stores of food, water, fuel and emergency supplies on hand in case they are stranded in their homes for a few days.
Following recent events, foreigner journalists are reminded that practicing journalism in Zimbabwe without accreditation is a crime punishable by arrest, incarceration, fine and/or deportation. Furthermore, you should avoid using cameras in any public locations, particularly those characterized by political activity, as this could be perceived by Zimbabwean authorities as practicing illegal journalism.
The ongoing political and economic crisis in Zimbabwe is characterized by shortages of food, including basic commodities, as well as medicines and foreign exchange. Canadians should also be aware that interruptions to the supply of water and electricity are frequent and lengthy in many areas, resulting in considerable hardship. The quality and safety of services such as public transportation, health care and drinking water has been greatly reduced, and as a result, you should ensure you have adequate health care travel insurance, including medical air evacuation, at all times.
Zimbabwe is currently experiencing a serious fuel shortage. This is affecting road travel throughout the country. Visitors should expect delays and inconvenience with public transport. Travellers should review their travel plans in advance since some public transport operators have withdrawn their services.
Visits to commercial farming areas should be avoided, particularly where issues persist over the ownership of land. Central and local authorities in some rural areas occasionally respond to outsiders with suspicion and hostility.
Crime, exacerbated by a very difficult economic situation, remains a serious problem for foreign visitors and residents alike.
It is a criminal offence in Zimbabwe to make derogatory or insulting comments about President Mugabe, a member of his government, or the Zimbabwean government itself.
Travellers should avoid low income districts in urban areas such as Harare and Bulawayo. In 2007, violent clashes between protestors and security forces took place in the capital of Harare and other cities across the country, resulting in injuries. The situation remains unpredictable and could deteriorate without warning.

 

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